Powers

There are an infinite number of powers, and any power you choose is subject to my discretion. However, I am very lenient when it comes to power choice.

One of the most common powers is that of the super-ability, including super-Strength, super-Toughness, super-Intellect, and so forth. This requires at least a Great rank in the ability in question. This also includes Speedsters.

Another common power set is that of energy control and projection, such as Fire, Sonic, or something else.

You can also choose to be a super-Skilled character. This could be a Gadgeteer-type or Weapon Master, or even a Martial Artist.

Shapechangers are common as well.

Mentalists are highly uncommon, and are usually stamped out immediately by the Machine.

Other types of powers are, of course, possible.

For each rank in your power (whose first rank is Fair), you must expend 5 Character Points.

Power Points

For each rank of the power you choose, you gain power points equal to 3 ^ (your current rank in the power).. Thus:
At Fair rank, you get 1 power point.
At Good rank, you get 3 power points.
At Great rank, you get 9 power points.
At Superb rank, you get 27 power points.
At Excellent rank, you get 81 power points.
These stack with each other. Thus, if you increase your power rank from Fair to Great, you gain 12 (3 + 9) power points.

Power points gained from different powers do not stack with each other, but remain separate. You may choose to spend these points at any time, unlike Character Points, even in the middle of a battle.

You may spend power points on special effects of your powers. These effects may do most anything, but their cost in power points depends on their scale and complexity:

If they have a single target, they have a rating of 0.
If they have a few targets or a small area, they have a rating of 1.
If they affect many targets or a large area, they have a rating of 2.
If they affect a 1-block radius or so, or very many targets, they have a rating of 3.
If they affect an entire city, they have a rating of 4.
If they affect the entire Machine, they have a rating of 5.
If it is a simple effect, it has a rating modifier of +0.
If it is a moderately complex effect, it has a rating modifier of +1.
If it is a complex effect, it has a rating modifier of +2.
if it is a very complex effect, it has a rating modifier of +3.
If it is an extremely complex effect, it has a rating modifier of +4.
If it is an impossibly complex effect, it has a rating modifier of +5.

So, for example, if we take a Fire Controller, a single blast of fire that attacks a single target would have a rating of 0, +0 because it is a simple and easily-understood effect of fire. A fireball that affects a large number of people would have a rating of 2, +0 because it is still a simple and easily-understood effect of fire. Flying on a stream of fire, however, would have a rating of 0 (only affects the controller), +1 because it is a slightly more complex effect of fire.

Let’s take another example. Let’s say you have super-Strength. A basic power would be the ability to throw large boulders at random people. This is a simple and easily-understood effect, and would have a rating of 0. Similarly, the ability to get around quickly by leaping from building to building would be simple and easily-understood, and would also have a rating of 0. However, the ability to pick up a piece of the street and send a wave of asphalt through a group of police officers standing in a barricade affects significantly more people (base of 2) and is a complex effect, requiring finesse as well as strength (rating +2) for a total rating of 4. Or, perhaps, if you were to punch the ground hard enough to cause a major earthquake, that would affect the entire city (rating 4) and be an extremely complex effect (rating +4) for a total rating of 8.

A power effect costs 5 ^ (rating) power points per rank (starting at Fair), and you cannot have a power effect with a rating higher than your overall power rating.

Powers

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